Putting Activities Through the SAMR Exercise

Part of learning in 2014 is NOT to just CONSUME information, but to also contribute and create information.

If you enjoy reading the information and resources shared here on the Langwitches blog or via my Twitter feed, consider taking the time to contribute. There is no grade assigned to your contribution, there is no certificate attached and there is no one waving their finger at you, if you don’t turn your homework in.

This is about self-motivation and self-directed learning in professional development. This is about being part of learning through the power of the crowd versus alone.

This is your chance to collaborate , contribute and pushing forward in education (and LEARN along the way)! Read on…

SAMR-model

Using the SAMR template (based on Ruben Puentedura),  Silvana Meneghini and I have developed  and  described in my previous blog post, here is an your chance to participate in a crowdsourced opportunity! (It will only work if the crowd gets motivated)

How to participate:

  1. Read through the SAMR Template Framework for Professional Development, if you have not done so.
  2. Think of a traditionally taught lesson/activity. What is the entry point on the SAMR model for your lesson/activity.
  3. Take a look a another example (High School History Essay) described below the survey.
  4. Fill out the  survey  below to contribute examples of activities and their movement from substitution to redefinition.
  5. If you would like us to share the results (examples shared by others) with you, please make sure you enter your email in the form below.


Here is an exercise example from Silvana Meneghini for you to follow:

Name of Activity:  History Essay

Grade Level: High School (Grade 9-12)

Activity Description: Essay writing is a very traditional form of assessment in HS History.
As a formative assessment for the “Ideas that Shaped the Modern World”, students were asked to write 5 essays following chosen prompts covering all the different topics learned throughout the year. Traditionally, the essays were just handed in to the teacher.

substitution-icon

Students use computer to type up essay, then print it to hand in to the teacher.

Goals Process Technology Communication
literacy-basic consume-produce Writing 1-1
 Basic Literacy  Consume>Produce>Feedback  Writing 1:1

augmentation-icon

Students develop a design that is inviting to a broader audience and also translates the spirit of the eMagazine. The design follows a magazine style with columns and illustrations searched mainly under Creative Commons.

Students research information using Internet, Databases and Books.

Students use a shared Google Presentation to get organized in the creation of the eMagazine sections, cover, table of contents and Editor Notes.

Students cooperate to create an eMagazines organized by topic sections. Each section shows individual student author interpretations of the prompt for the topic. An Editor’s Note is added to explain the tone of the eMagazine. The eMagazines are published online on Calameo with the open possibility for Comments. (Example http://www.calameo.com/books/00242383955b5bde7fdba)eMags:

Goals Process Technology Communication
literacy-basic consume-produce-feedback Writing 1-group
 Basic Literacy  Consume>Produce>Feedback  Writing 1: Small Group
 literacy-media
 Media Literacy
Information Literacy

Information
Literacy

modification-icon

Students collaborate in the writing and thinking process by developing a Section Editor’s Note that analyzes common ideas and disagreements and also a “Bio” of student authors focused on individual political perspectives. Students argue and defend ideas through the eMag comment section.

Students follow twitter hashtags that may lead to interesting information and organizations that will help connect to modern day history.

Goals Process Technology Communication
literacy-network consume > produce > feedback > revise Writing 1-group
 Network Literacy

 Consume>
Produce>
Feedback>
Revise

 Writing 1: Small Group
 Information Literacy
 Information
Literacy
literacy-media

Media Literacy

redefinition-icon

Students collaborate with classes from other countries to create an eMag with a global perspective analysis.

Students invite Historian experts to contribute to information gathering and analysis.

Students manage collaborative platforms to interact with other classes and experts around the world, generating an eMag with a global approach and reach.

 

Goals Process Technology Communication
literacy-network consume > produce > feedback > revise Writing global
 Network Literacy  Consume>
Produce>
Feedback>
Revise
 Writing Global Communication
 Information Literacy
 Information
Literacy
literacy-media
Media Literacy
literacy-global
Global Literacy