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Sketchnoting and Making Learning Visible Workshop

I spent the day yesterday at St. Paul’s Education Conference here in São Paulo yesterday and attended Ben Mardell‘s  session Making Learning Visible: Children and Adults as Individual and Group Learners

Over the past few decades, much attention has been devoted to developing learning communities in schools. Yet the attainment of knowledge and understanding is still primarily viewed as an individual process. In and outside the classroom, thinking and learning are generally considered individual rather than social and communicative acts. This course is for educators who want to explore the power of the group as a learning environment. Participants will learn about documentation as a central component of learning groups, enabling group members to see how and what they are learning. Group learning practices and examples of learning groups from early childhood, elementary and high school classrooms from new book Visible Learners: Promoting Reggio-Inspired Approaches in All Schools will be explored. Participants will take part in an activity that helps them consider such questions as (1) What is the relationship between individual and group learning?; (2)How can teachers support the creation of learning groups?; and (3) How might the process of observing and documenting children’s learning shape that learning?

I did not tweet the session very much, since I am trying to improve my sketchnoting (visual note taking) skills. I am pleased (not necessarily with the artistic rendition, handwriting skills, etc.), but with the process of note taking. When I look at my image:

  • I am able to recall details that were discussed
  • I am able to quickly see the main points I got out of the session
  • I am able to re- follow the flow of points made

making learning visible

Visible Thinking in Math- Part 2

This is the second part of the blog post : Visible Thinking in Math

Another Math teacher (sixth grade) at Graded, The American School of São Paulo , Laurel Janewicz, has been passionately piloting metacognitive thinking and reflection in her own Math classes.

She started out with laying a foundation from the start of the school year.
Listen to her students explain the why, how and what next of metacognition in Math class.
Why?

How?

What Now?

How could she give her students practice in articulating their mathematical thinking? We chose to use iPads and Explain Everything app.

photo 2

photo 3

 

photo 5

Process:

thinking-about-thinking-math

  1. Students took an image of the Math problem
  2. Students recorded themselves solving the Math problem. Emphasis was placed on articulating their thought process, including when they thought “I really don’t know where to start”. Helping making their “fluency” of following thinking like that with strategies to continue audible.
  3. Once the video of them writing and talking themselves through solving the problem (correctly or incorrectly solved), the project file was saved as a video clip and exported to the camera role.
  4. Another student was then charged in starting a new Explain Everything project on the same iPad and importing the previously saved video clip from the Photo Gallery.
  5. It was the new student’s job to watch and listen to the thought process and annotate mathematical thinking and strategies observed.
  6. The new video (original video clip plus annotations, written and oral) was saved as a new video clip and uploaded to Google Drive to be able to be embedded into a blog post

Examples of one of the final video clips (make sure you listen to oral annotations by student #2… about 3:13 minutes into the recording).

Laurel presented at the AASSA (Association of American Schools in South America) conference this past month with an elementary school colleague, Kelli Meeker, about her findings and experience of Redefining Reflection

Laurel also developed a few questions as follow up to help her students reflect on their blogfolio on the metacognition “project”

What does metacognition, thinking about your thinking, mean to you and how has it helped you in math?

Metacognition, thinking about my thinking, ……

What does your “inner voice” say to you or what questions does it ask you as you solve a problem?

I have an inner voice that …..

How has reflecting on your thinking while solving a problem helped your mathematical thinking?

Reflecting on my thinking/listening to my inner voice while doing math ….

What have you learned about yourself as a mathematician from this project and from this whole year?

This project/This year I ….

Below are a few excerpts of student responses. Click on the students’ name to see their entire blog post and embedded video.

Brenna

Thinking about my thinking is reflecting in my own words. It is thinking about how your thinking can improve and what your thinking has mastered. When I am thinking about my math thinking like when I am screen casting a video on Explain Everything, my inner voice tells me to break up the problem and then read the specific part and work on that part. Afterwards, I think about if this is a good strategy or not. I think that this Explain Everything project has helped me a lot because I solved a problem and then I listened to my thinking while solving the problem

Pedro

In math, Ms. J taught us to kind of talk to our “inner voice.” I only talk to my inner voice in difficult problems, I sort of ask for help. When I’m with my inner voice, I try to think differently, and usually can get a way for my answer, but I need to concentrate a lot. While I reflect on my thinking I always think in a better way. This helps because I always question myself and see if I’m really correct. I get to a more profound way of thinking.

Jack

We have been focusing on metacognition while doing math. This means thinking about our thinking, and asking our selves, “What am I doing, and why?”Using metacognition has really helped me analyze my results in math and it has also made my work a lot more error-free. Whenever I do questions now, and I am not sure how I got my answer, or if it is right, than I always think back to what I did to find out the answer, and if I could do anything better. This is also a habit of mathematical thinking that I find that I am very good at, and I use a alot.

Fiona

 Metacognition, thinking about thinking. When Ms.J first introduced this to us I was like, What The heck! What does she expect us to do? But now I see that it’s a useful skill that has improved not only my math skills but my other classes as well. Very early on i realized that I loved to talk. Ever since i was little i knew this. So it’s one of the reasons why sometimes I think I get bad grades in math. I hate being alone, and in fact am afraid of being alone, so not talking is a symptom. I usually struggle in silence because I like to work through my thinking  aloud. Which was why I benefited from this project so much.

Alyssa

I think that I can apply metacognition to lots of different things, like sports that I play, like basketball. During a game, I can ask myself: “Why isn’t this working? What can I do to improve?” The next quarter, I can work on improving in those aspects to help the team win the game.

Maya

 I realized while doing the project that in my head I am thinking about more than one aspect of the problem at a time, as we call it in math class, my inner voice. It was constantly checking if what I was doing made sense and figuring out other efficient and coherent ways to solve it, so if I had any difficulties or needed to revise my work I could use them. By, also, hearing my second voice I was able to understand the problem on another level, meaning I could draw the right visuals, analyze it, and do it with a different method.

Nana

When I first came here from 5th grade, I soon realized that I was not really listening to my thinking, actually not at all.  I still did not know what metacognition actually meant and could not define it in first quarter. Now I can define it, and know what it is.  So then, I started to think more deeply what I am doing and why I am doing this while doing these problems in my head.  This has really helped me because it can not only help you to see the reasonableness of the answer but also to read more carefully.

Yael

Metacognition helped me, because, when I make a mistake in the problem, I don’t really notice it, unless someone else shows me what the mistake was, or where it was. After hearing myself in the problem, I can tell if I made a mistake. For example, if I misread the problem and didn’t notice, then heard what my thinking was, I would’ve noticed the mistake I had made. Metacognition, to me, means understanding what works, and what doesn’t work in your head.

Lara

When I would reflect my thinking on the iPad, it helped me by looking over my homework’s, my tests and etc. It would help me now and then. My inner voice would ask me “Does this answer make sense?” “How did you get this answer?” When my father would ask me “How did you do this problem?” I would say “I don’t know?” That when I realized that I need to ask myself these things. Now metacognition helps me a lot, like when I am asking my dad for some help and when I am doing a problem by myself

Roseanne

I have an inner voice. I think that the whole purpose of the iPad projects, was to find my math inner voice, and use it. I think I found that inner voice. I’m pretty proud of myself for that because it was with my first projects, it was pretty hard, though now, for sure I found it. It helps me wonder, and think: Should I use this chart or this chart? Which method works best?

Diego

While doing these problems, I have sort of an “inner voice.” Not in the crazy, psychopathic way, but the thinking way. I tell myself to do this or do that, or check my work. I say hundreds of things to myself in my head. And I always ask myself how I did this. I explain to myself, and try to find mistakes. Mistakes teach you that to become great at math, you need to make mistakes. Albert Einstein once said,”A person that never made a mistake never tried anything.” I know I’ve made mistakes that that inner voice saved me from.

We are having conversations, looking at student samples, tweaking how reflection and thinking about their thinking impacts student understanding and learning as well as create peer-created resources for future students (think Alan November’s thoughts about leaving a legacy).

A million thanks go to Laurel and Adam for sharing their thoughts, questions, trials, failures and success in the process and most importantly their willingness to make it transparent for others to learn with and from their process.

Do you have student samples of making mathematical thinking visible? Please share the link for all of us to learn from and have quality examples to model after.

More examples of students “writing” in Math:

Augmented Reality that’s “Real” and Focused on Learning

cross posted with permission from Dr. Silvana Meneghini,’s On The Edge Blog.

Silvana, the High School Technology Coordinator at Graded, The American School of São Paulo, shared a How-To post to connect augmented reality to student reflection by adding a layer of learning (not technology for technology sake). I highly recommend adding her blog to your RSS reader and following her on Twitter to connect with her learning and teaching journey.

Enjoy Silvana’s post below:

Augmented Reality allows you to expand the experience of the real world with information, video, sound, GPS data, and so on. If well utilized, it can be much more than just another cool tech thing… You will see below an example of how Augmented Reality was used to expand the experience of visitors to our school’s Art Exhibit. As students had to reflect on and verbalize their artistic choices, an augmented reality layer was created for viewers of the exhibit. In the process, students were excited about sharing with an authentic audience and had to really recall and reflect. It created a hyperlinked reality that enabled amplification of the viewers’ learning experience that was much more engaging than text.

aurasma1

By pointing a tablet or smartphone at a painting, through the viewing lens of Aurasma App, visitors could learn about the artist that influenced the work and techniques that were applied. Through Aurasma, an “overlay” video appears to be coming directly out of the painting and the student starts talking to you.

But wait… this engaging effect of merging the video with the real object does not happen automatically in Aurasma Studio. It was consciously created to provide the “real” augmented reality experience, through the use of green screen effects. In order to do that, the overlay video had to be superimposed on the image of the real object, which is easily done with the GreenScreen by Do Ink App on iPad . So we first took a picture of the painting that was then inserted as a background at the Green Screen App. As we hold the iPad to record the student, we would already see the painting image on the background, allowing the correct positioning of the iPad camera to give the desired illusion. This is a very easy and quick process if you have a green screen already setup in your school and the students were able to do the recording by themselves.

aurasma2

Below you can watch the overlay video for the Horsehead painting created with Green Screen by Do Ink, and check the type of content on artistic choices and technique. Aurasma was used only to create an “Aura”, which is a combination of the “trigger” image (picture of the real object, in this case the painting) and the “overlay”.
aurasma3

How to:

Step 1: Take a picture of the real object for your Trigger Image

    • Tip:
      • If the trigger image is not detailed enough it will generate an error.
      • Crop the image on its more detailed parts.
      • The resulting Aura will be focused around the cropped part, but at least it will show.

Step 2: Use a Green Screen App to create an Overlay Video

  • Install Green Screen by Do Ink from Apple Store on iPad or Cell Phone (Tutorial)
  • Add the Camera to record over green screen
  • Add the Trigger Image (the same as the real object – will show on the background)
  • Place camera so actor appears in the right position over background image
  • Record

Step 3: Use Aurasma Studio to create an Aura

  • Prefer the online Aurasma Studio to the App
  • Add a Channel
  • Add your Trigger image
  • Add your Overlay video
  • Create / Add an Aura:
    • Select Trigger image
    • Select Overlay
    • Choose Channel

Aurasma4

Step 4: Provide instructions for Viewers

    • Install the Aurasma App
    • Search for your Channel
    • Follow the Channel
    • Then point to the real object and see the Aura come to life!

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Augmented Reality that’s “Real” and Focused on Learning

aurasma1

cross posted with permission from Dr. Silvana Meneghini,’s On The Edge Blog. Silvana, the High School Technology Coordinator at Graded, The American School of São Paulo, shared a How-To post to connect augmented reality to student reflection by adding a layer of learning (not technology for technology sake). I highly …

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TPCK

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fail

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Redefining My Learning

story

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Reflection

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minecraft-tutorial

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selfies

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eduplanet

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SLC

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Visible Thinking in Math- Part 1

fail

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ipad-components-content

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Visible Thinking in Math- Part 1

fail

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image2-lens-of-pedagogy

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Slide1

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pedro

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