Student created eTextbooks for Integrated Science I Labs

Integrated Science I  wanted the students to create their own online textbooks based on their notes and activities from the EduChange program adopted by the school.

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At a Substitution levels, students could just copy and paste to a Google Document, to organize individual notes.

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At an Augmentation level, students in this class took advantage of the collaborative nature of a Google Presentation to create a group eTextbook. Students took on different roles, as they split the work, as indicated below. Therefore, students were cooperating to different parts of the eTextbook.

Suggested student roles to differentiate etextbook creation

Challenges of Time Constraints
One of the main concerns presented by the teachers is the time constraints for having a collaboratively created etextbook. As they are following EduChange Labs, those are prescribed to fit exactly their schedule, leaving no time for extras. So after some discussion we came to the following agreement, which seemed not only to improve the etextbook notetaking as a learning exercise but also to help teachers in their asassessment task.

eTextbook Notetaking as a Learning Exercise
The rationale for students taking on different roles in the etextbook creation is to allow for different perspectives and styles in notetaking and labs to emerge. That allows students to look at the topic in a different way, which will hopefully encourage interest in the etextbook as a study guide. Instead of the student creating a notebook with his/her own notes, different students will contribute with different parts of the etextbook . A step forward would be to have students on a single role negotiate their notes and either select the best one or mix the best parts of all of them. But for the sake of time, students will use notes from a single student each time, in that particular role.

eTextbook Facilitating Assessment
In the discussion with the teachers, it became clear that the eTextbook can be helpful in their task to assess student completion of their EduChange Lab docs. Instead of checking every student for every lab doc, teachers can assess the student contribution to the eTextbook. That would create a rotation and student roles would be chosen at random, making sure all are evaluated at some point. In this way students will have to keep up with good notes to be ready for the eTextbook.

Sample eTextbook. Work on Creative Commons and Citations.
This is a sample eTextbook, which was downloaded from Google Presentation into a PDF then uploaded to Calameo, which is an epublication application online. The students who took the role of image editors were responsible for searching on Creative Commons and writing citations to give credit to the images. Abiding by Copyright is a work in progress at the school and while many students are already aware and using Creative Commons, there may still be some use of images under Fair Use.

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Students have been encouraged to create their own graphic organizers and images for the eTextbooks, so they will be slowly adding their own multimedia remix of the notes. We also want to explore the Commenting feature of Calameo to get feedback from other schools who use those eTextbooks.

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At a Redefinition level we would have our students interact and collaborate with students from other schools in the feedback >reflect> review process of eTextbook creation.

Brainstorming Visual Notetaking Strategies

The idea of taking visual notes is spreading on the Internet. Sunny Brown has called it the Doodle Revolution, and it is supported by brain research that highlights the importance of images in learning. Students in International Relations, with Ms LaFrance, have been assigned different articles for reading and becoming experts on.  In order to share and contribute to the learning of others, students will produce Visual Notes in RSA animation or screencasting format. Ideas for applications for laptop and iPads are given at the Visual Thinking page within the HS Academic Tech Support site.

The first step for the students was to learn about Visual Notetaking and the type of strategies needed to create effective visuals that communicate well.

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Traditionally, students would watch a video in class, maybe discuss a little and then move on to work. At a Substitution level, students could have the video available online to watch anytime anywhere.

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As an augmentation, students could use an application to add individual comments to the video while watching it online.

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At the International Relations class, the idea was to actively engage the students in collaborative note-taking while the video was played in class, by creating a Google Spreadsheet with main keywords from the video. Each student or group of students typed keywords in one column of the spreadsheet. At the end of the video, they had to “clean up” the keywords list by deleting or renaming keywords in agreement with peers, so we could have as many similar keywords as possible. The keywords were directly copied from the Google spreadsheet to Wordle, to create the class list of visual note taking strategies.

We are now looking forward to the student created visual notes videos! This work was a collaboration between Ms LaFrance and the HS Academic Technology Coordinator, Mrs Meneghini.

Visual Note Taking Strategies Wordle – from International relation class
Class keywords brainstorm during video presentation

 

Integrated Math I Blogfolios

This is a cross post from Technology is Happening @

Ms Ange in Grade 9 Integrated Math I, has taken the challenge of having student create individual blogfolios to reflect on their math learning. As all students in Grade 9 have already created a Google Site Digital Portfolio that is being used in English and Visual Arts, so the students were taught how to link their Math blogfolio directly from the ePortfolio site under “Mathemathics”. In this way, all their learning reflections are connected to a central hub.

The challenge in a blogfolio is to create appropriate “labels” that will allow retrieval of posts according to learning goals. The thoughtful creation and use of labels is a great support to reflection, which is a Modification stage on the SAMR model.

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A Substitution approach would involve students reproducing their work in a blog post, as a form of documentation, transferring from paper to the online world.

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an Augmentation level, students would enrich their posts with snapshots of their work, as well as links to resources and videos or screencasts. The expectation in this class was that students did illustrate their documentation, going beyond text.

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One step further on posting in a blog is the reflection on learning that not only happens along the way in individual posts but also happens as students are able to retrieve blog posts under a certain learning goal and evaluate progress according to goals. The definition of labels was a crucial discussion between the teacher and the Academic Tech in order to guarantee labels that would  live through all the grades in the HS and that could also link to previous grades.

Labels for Learning Goals

The conversation started with my suggestion of the use of Graded’s core values, as well as the grade and class name as labels. Then, the teacher explored possible labels to indicate learning progress in Math. After some discussion on how to use main ideas from the Math AERO standards that would add subject related specificity , here are the final labels that covered core values and math specific goals. An initial task for the students was to create a post where all labels were copied from the teacher’s template, so the whole class had the same labels to work on during the year:

 

Long term learning goals

The first post created by the students involved their learning goal(s) for Math associated with Graded’s Core Values. As they wrote their posts, students also selected the core value labels that corresponded to their goal as shown in the example below:


This is Ms Ange’s comment on the students’s goal setting exercise on the blog:

 

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At  the Redefinition stage, students would get input from experts on their blog posts and also connect with students from different cultures who may see and use mathematics in different ways.

Using Popplet in the Foreign Language Classroom

6th graders are studying Health and Illness related vocabulary in Ms. Piragene’s Portuguese class.

How do we learn vocabulary of a second, third or fourth language best?  As a class, we discussed different methods including  mnemonic devices and how they help us remember, organize and make connections in our brain. Some of us prefer:

  • visual connections
  • rhyming words
  • acronyms
  • a sentence in context
  • humorous connections
  • etc.

In order to embed modern skills and literacies and connect to our school’s  Core Values and mission, students created Popplets.

The tool (Popplet) allowed students to create a web based mind map. Each  bubble/ “popplet”represented a vocabulary word related to medicine/illness/symptoms.

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SAMR CONNECTION (SAMR Model based on Ruben Puentedura‘s Work)
At this point, using the tool merely served as a SUBSTITUTION
 of the original task. The mind map could have been drawn on a piece of paper  with colored pencils or markers.

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It became clear quickly how each of the students’ minds worked. Some were linear, some arranged the vocabulary words circular, some connected them by content, etc.

Students color coded the popplet, moved them around the canvas, resized, organized, arranged and connected popplets with each other. In addition to text, they could embedded an image or a video into the popplet.

SAMR-thumb

SAMR CONNECTION (SAMR Model based on Ruben Puentedura‘s Work)
At his point, we entered the AUGMENTATION stage. “The tool acts as a direct tool substitute with functional improvement”. The ability to easily move the popplets around, change colors at a whim and create or delete connections improve the task.  

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Popplet has different options to insert media. One can either choose to upload and use your own image file, find an image on Flickr or insert a video via Vimeo or YouTube.

SAMR-thumb

SAMR CONNECTION (SAMR Model based on Ruben Puentedura‘s Work)
At his point, we entered the MODIFICATION stage. “Technology allows for a significant task redesign” We have moved from a “flat”, “linear” and “2-dimensional” written down list on a piece of paper to a transmedia representation of vocabulary words (including text, images and videos).

popplet-images

First, I thought “Great”, Popplet provides an easy way for students to access images for their projects. As I was looking closer at this “insert images from Flickr”  function, I wondered WHAT copyright license these images actually had? I chose to throw out the questions to Popplet directly via Twitter (see below). Unfortunately, the answer that I received did not satisfy me completely. I tried to probe a little further, but did not receive any further response.

popplet-tweet

I wonder what exactly does Popplet mean by “It is up to individual creators and depends on whether it is for public or personal use…”?

  • Do they mean that using a possibly copyrighted image from Flickr is ok to use if it is for personal use only? (Not really)
  • Do they mean that using a possibly Creative Commons licensed image WITHOUT giving attribution (there is no way to find the URL of the original image on Flickr) will be up to each user  (not really)
  • Do they mean that when the Popplet is intended for Public use (as in embedding them in a student blog) they should not be using their provided image search function?

Most students wanted to add images to their popplets. In discussing LARK guidelines (Digital Citizenship), it suddenly was unclear and difficult in finding images and how to cite them properly.

popplet

So, for now, I advised our students to upload their own photos/illustrations or search for Public Domain and Creative Commons  images on other sites. Here are a few links to help them search and find images suitable to be re-used on their blogs or other work.

Once the Popplet was created, students were to embed the popplet on their blogfolios using the provided embed code. Next step will be to write a reflection on how the process of using a mind map helped them learn. Students will read each other’s examples, look at the different organization variations and comment on each others blog posts.

SAMR-thumb

SAMR CONNECTION (SAMR Model based on Ruben Puentedura‘s Work)
Once students share their mindmap on their blogs, opening them up for a global audience to see and give feedback on, we will have moved into the REDEFINITION stage. “Technology allows for the creation of a new task, previously inconceivable”. Students will be able to share and learn from others.

Find the popplet used to model the process below:

History Essay

This is a SAMR example shared by Silvana Meneghini, High School Academic Technology Coordinator at Graded School, São Paulo, Brazil.

Essay writing is a very traditional form of assessment in HS History.
As a formative assessment for the “Ideas that Shaped the Modern World”, students were asked to write 5 essays following chosen prompts covering all the different topics learned throughout the year. Traditionally, the essays were handed in to the teacher.

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Students use computer to type up essay, then print it to hand in to the teacher.

GOALS PROCESS TECHNOLOGY COMMUNICATION
literacy-basic consume-produce Writing 1-1
Basic Literacy Consume>Produce Writing 1: 1

 

augmentation-icon

Students develop a design that is inviting to a broader audience and also translates the spirit of the eMagazine. The design follows a magazine style with columns and illustrations searched mainly under Creative Commons.

Students research information using Internet, Databases and Books.

Students use a shared Google Presentation to get organized in the creation of the eMagazine sections, cover, table of contents and Editor Notes.

Students cooperate to create an eMagazines organized by topic sections. Each section shows individual student author interpretations of the prompt for the topic. An Editor’s Note is added to explain the tone of the eMagazine. The eMagazines are published online on Calameo with the open possibility for Comments. (Example http://www.calameo.com/books/00242383955b5bde7fdba)eMags)

Goals Process Technology Communication
literacy-basic consume-produce-feedback Writing 1-group
Basic Literacy Consume>Produce> Feedback Writing 1: Small Group
Information Literacy
Information
Literacy
literacy-media

Media Literacy

 

modification-icon

Students collaborate in the writing and thinking process by developing a Section Editor’s Note that analyzes common ideas and disagreements and also a “Bio” of student authors focused on individual political perspectives. Students argue and defend ideas through the eMag comment section.

Students follow twitter hashtags that may lead to interesting information and organizations that will help connect to modern day history.

GOALS PROCESS TECHNOLOGY COMMUNICATION
literacy-basic consume-produce-feedback-revise Writing 1-group
Basic Literacy Consume>Produce> Feedback>Revise Writing 1: Small Group
Information Literacy
Information
Literacy
literacy-media
Media Literacy

 

redefinition-icon 

Students collaborate with classes from other countries to create an eMag with a global perspective analysis.

Students invite Historian experts to contribute to information gathering and analysis.

Students manage collaborative platforms to interact with other classes and experts around the world, generating an eMag with a global approach and reach.

Goals Process Technology Communication
literacy-network consume > produce > feedback > revise Writing global
Network Literacy Consume>Produce> Feedback> Revise Writing Global
Information Literacy
Information
Literacy
literacy-media

Media Literacy

literacy-global
Global Literacy

Middle School- Official Scribe

This is a SAMR example shared by Silvia Tolisano, Middle School Academic Technology Coordinator at Graded School, São Paulo, Brazil.

In the traditional activity, students take individual classroom notes with paper/pen to study from for upcoming quiz, test or exam.

substitution-icon At the Substitution level, students use computer to type up notes.

Goals Process Technology Communication
literacy-basic consume-produce note-taking 1-1
Basic Literacy Consume>Produce Note Nating 1:1

 

augmentation-icon  At the Augmentation level, students use formatting options to organize, highlight, edit, rearrange their notes. Students are printing out or emailing their notes to share with their classmates.

GOALS PROCESS TECHNOLOGY COMMUNICATION
literacy-basic consume-produce note-taking 1-group
Basic Literacy Consume>Produce Note Nating 1:Group

modification-iconAt the Modification level, students are creating their own blog post, using a variety of technology tools and methods to create annotated screenshots, videos, images to bring in different perspectives and address various learning styles.

Students are creating collaborative notes via a Google Document, which is shared with the entire class. Everyone can contribute, add information, edit incorrect information,etc.

Note taking is not confined to remembering and regurgitating information heard in class, but (hyper)linked to further reading of text, images, audio and video. Students are labeling/categorizing their blog post and information to make organization and information search easier. Students are solving problems of how to handle information overload and filter relevant information to make organization and information search easier. Students are solving problems of how to handle information overload and filter relevant information.

Goals Process Technology Communication
literacy-basic consume-produce-feedback note-taking 1-group
Basic Literacy Consume>Produce> Feedback Note Taking 1:Group
literacy-network  blogging
Network Literacy  Blogging
literacy-information

Information Literacy

 

redefinition-icon At the Redefinition level, students are contributors to a collaborative blog site, alternating being the Official Scribe of day. Collaboratively they “write”their own online textbook. Students express their understanding through a variety of media. Students use the blog as a learning hub to communicate and connect beyond their classroom walls, connecting with peers and experts from around the world.

GOALS PROCESS TECHNOLOGY COMMUNICATION
literacy-basic consume-produce-feedback note-taking global
Basic Literacy Consume>Produce> Feedback Note Taking Global
literacy-network  blogging
Network Literacy  Blogging
literacy-information
Information Literacy

 

The Writing and Publishing Process

This is a SAMR example shared by Andrea Hernandez

In the traditional activity, student produces a piece of writing that begins with a pre-write and goes through the stages of the writing process culminating with “publishing.” Depending on how far back you want to go, traditionally published writing could mean that it is written very neatly and hung on a bulletin board, or typed and made into a book for the classroom or school library.

substitution-icon At the Substitution level, published writing is word-processed and an art program is used for illustrating.

Goals Process Technology Communication
literacy-basic consume-produce Writing 1-1
Basic Literacy Consume>Produce Writing 1: 1

 

augmentation-icon  At the Augmentation level, teacher uses a word processing program to track changes and make editing suggestions.

Goals Process Technology Communication
literacy-basic consume > produce > feedback > revise Writing 1-1
Basic Literacy Consume>Produce> Feedback> Revise Writing 1: 1

 

modification-iconAt the Modification level, the editing process is modified with use of a tool such as Google docs.Tool enables feedback to become part of the process in a more organic, collaborative way than previously possible. Students partner with writers from other schools to share their writing during different stages in the process.

Goals Process Technology Communication
literacy-basic consume > produce > feedback > revise Writing global
Baisc Literacy Consume>Produce> Feedback> Revise Writing Global
literacy-global
Global Literacy

 

redefinition-icon At the Redefinition level, writing is enhanced/elaborated with use of creative multimedia. For example, student writes a personal narrative which is turned into a video, an animated video, a student-read audio book, etc. Published writing is shared with a worldwide audience via student blogs with potential for authentic and diverse feedback. Hyperlinks are used to deepen content and make meaningful connections to related material.

Goals Process Technology Communication
literacy-media consume > produce > feedback > revise blogging global
Media Literacy Consume>Produce> Feedback> Revise Blogging Global
literacy-global
Global Literacy

 

Learning about the weather, its patterns and its effect on people.

This is a SAMR example shared by Allanah King

In the traditional activity, children would go outside and look at the weather in their location. They would record over time the patterns in the weather and they would research about the weather from books in the library.

substitution-icon At the Substitution level, students use a camera to take photos of different kinds of weather, use weather related websites to find out more about the kinds of weather in your area.

Goals Process Technology Communication
literacy-media consume-produce audio-visual 1-1
Media Literacy Consume>Produce Audio-Visual 1:1
Information Literacy  research
Information
Literacy
 Research

 

augmentation-icon At the Augmentation level, students  use Instaweather Pro to take photos of the weather looking at the extra information given through the app location temperature humidity. Record this information to record weather patterns at your location.

GOALS PROCESS TECHNOLOGY COMMUNICATION
literacy-media consume-produce audio-visual global
Media Literacy Consume>Produce Audio-Visual Global
Information Literacy  research
Information
Literacy
 Research

 

modification-iconAt the Modification level, students share their weather data with other classes or schools that are geographically distant to you but are in the same country (NZ is a small country. You could substitute a state if you were in America or a large country.) Comparing weather patterns and tracking weather systems as thy move across the country.

GOALS PROCESS TECHNOLOGY COMMUNICATION
literacy-media consume-produce audio-visual global
Media Literacy Consume>Produce Audio-Visual Global
Information Literacy  research
Information
Literacy
 Research

 

redefinition-icon At the Redefinition level, students set up an open Google Spreadsheet for classes in different hemispheres to collate, curate and analyse the weather patterns in the different hemispheres. In this way students can learn about the seasons and their affect on global weather patterns in an authentic way.

GOALS PROCESS TECHNOLOGY COMMUNICATION
literacy-information consume-produce-feedback note-taking global
Information Literacy Consume>Produce>Feedback Note-Taking Global
literacy-global  research
Global Literacy  Research

 

Poetry and Song Unit in Grade 3

This is a SAMR example shared by Maggie Hos-McGrane, who is a Technology Coordinator at the American School of Bombay in India.

In the traditional activity, students learn about different types of poetry, after each type they handwrite a poem and decorate it. Pages are eventually bound together into a poetry anthology.

substitution-icon At the Substitution level, students create a poem and then type it out in Word or Google Docs. They format the poem and add an image.

GOALS PROCESS TECHNOLOGY COMMUNICATION
literacy-basic consume-produce Writing 1-1
Basic Literacy Consume>Produce Writing 1:1

 

modification-iconAt the Modification level, students create a piece of artwork and write a poem about it. They upload the artwork to a class VoiceThread and use the video tool to record themselves reading their poem. Students also learn about the difference between reading, reciting and performing a poem in order to create effective video. They comment on each others’ poems using the text commenting feature.

GOALS PROCESS TECHNOLOGY COMMUNICATION
Media Literacy consume-produce-feedback Writing 1-group
Media Literacy Consume>Produce> Feedback Writing 1:Group

 

redefinition-icon At the Redefinition level, students take photos that illuminate the message of their poems. Students use GarageBand to write a piece of music in a genre that matches their poem. Images and text are uploaded into Animoto and sound is added to the poem. Students take an embed code of the Animoto and add it to their blogs. They comment on each others” blogs and invite others in the wider community to comment too. Students skype with poet Kenn Nesbitt. They write a poem with him collaboratively. They then write their own poems and share them with others using Google Docs to get feedback. Students learn about visual literacy and how to move from decorating to illustrating and illuminating.

Goals Process Technology Communication
Media Literacy consume-produce-feedback Writing global
Media Literacy Consume>Produce> Feedback Writing Global
literacy-global      
Global Literacy